All Things Macaw

Anodorhynchus
  Species
  Anodorhynchus
  Common
and
binomial names
Image Description Area Range
  Extinct in Wild


Glaucous macaw
(Anodorhynchus glaucus)
Anodorhynchus glaucus.jpg 70 cm (27.5 in) long, mostly pale turquoise-blue with a large greyish head. It has a long tail and a large bill. It has a yellow, bare eye-ring and half-moon-shaped lappets bordering the mandible.[3] Hyacinth macaw - Wikipedia This bird was native to north Argentina, south Paraguay, the chaco and llano region of Bolivia near the city of Santa Cruz de la Sierra, northeast Uruguay, and Brazil. It became rare during the 19th century due to trapping and loss of habitat, and only two possible reports of wild birds were received in the 20th century. Expeditions by ornithologists to southwestern Paraguay during the 1990s failed to turn up any evidence of the species. 
  Hyacinth macaw
or hyacinthine macaw
(Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus)
Anodorhynchus hyacinthinus -Australia Zoo -8-2c.jpg 100 cm (39 in) long, 120-140 cm (48-56 in) wingspan. It is almost entirely blue and has black under the wings. It has a large black beak with bright yellow along the sides of the lower part of the beak and also yellow eyerings.[4] Hyacinth macaw - Wikipedia The hyacinth macaw survives today in three main populations in South America: In the Pantanal region of Brazil, and adjacent eastern Bolivia and northeastern Paraguay, in the Cerrado region of the eastern interior of Brazil (Maranhao, Piaui, Bhaia, Tocantins, Goias, Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul, and Minas Gerais), and in the relatively open areas associated with the Tocantins River, Xingu River, Tapajós River, and the Marajó island in the eastern Amazon Basin of Brazil. Smaller, fragmented populations may occur in other areas. 
  Lear's macaw
or indigo macaw
(Anodorhynchus leari)
Anodorhynchus leari by Edward Lear.jpg 70 cm (27.5 in) long, mainly blue and the head is a slightly paler blue. It has bare pale yellow skin at the base of its beak and orange-yellow eyerings. It has a large blackish beak.[5] Location of State of Bahia in Brazil For over a century after it had been described, the whereabouts of the wild population was unknown. It was eventually rediscovered in 1978 by ornithologist Helmut Sick in Bahia in the interior northeast of Brazil. Some thought the bird was a hybrid or variant involving the similar hyacinth macaw, but this idea was soon abandoned, as plumage, size, and proportions of Lear's macaw differ from those of its close relatives. It is known from two colonies at Toca Velha and Serra Branca, south of the Raso da Catarina plateau in northeast Bahia. In 1995, a roosting site holding 22 birds was located at Sento Sé/Campo Formoso, 200 km (120 mi) to the west.
Cyanopsitta
  Cyanopsitta
  Common and binomial names Image Description Area Range
  Extinct in Wild


Spix's macaw
or little blue macaw
(Cyanopsitta spixii)
Spixara.jpg
55–57 cm (22–22 in) long. Various shades of blue, including a pale blue head, pale blue underparts, and vivid blue upperparts, wings and tail.[6] ITACARE.COM - How to get there - Itacaré Beach - Bahia - Brazil The IUCN regard the Spix's macaw as extinct in the wild. Its last known stronghold in the wild was in northeastern Bahia, Brazil and sightings are very rare. After a 2000 sighting of a male bird, the next and last sighting was in 2016.The species is now maintained through a captive breeding program at several conservation organizations under the aegis of the Brazilian government. It is listed on CITES Appendix I, which makes trade illegal except for legitimate conservation, scientific or educational purposes.
Ara
  Ara
  Common
and
binomial names
Image Description Area Range
  Great green macaw
or Buffon's macaw
(Ara ambiguus)
Ara ambigua1.JPG 55–57 cm (22–22 in) long. Various shades of blue, including a pale blue head, pale blue underparts, and vivid blue upperparts, wings and tail.[6] ITACARE.COM - How to get there - Itacaré Beach - Bahia - Brazil The IUCN regard the Spix's macaw as extinct in the wild. Its last known stronghold in the wild was in northeastern Bahia, Brazil and sightings are very rare. After a 2000 sighting of a male bird, the next and last sighting was in 2016.The species is now maintained through a captive breeding program at several conservation organizations under the aegis of the Brazilian government. It is listed on CITES Appendix I, which makes trade illegal except for legitimate conservation, scientific or educational purposes.
  Blue-and-yellow macaw
or blue-and-gold macaw
(Ara ararauna)
80–90 cm (31.5–35.5 in) long. Mostly blue back and yellow front. Blue chin and green forehead. The upper zone of the bare white skin around each eye extending to the beak is patterned by lines of small dark feathers.   Panama, Colombia through to south-central Brazil.
  Green-winged macaw
or red-and-green macaw
(Ara chloroptera)
90 cm (36 in) long. Mostly red, with blue and green wings. The bare white skin around each eye extending to the bill is patterned by lines of small red feathers.   South America, from Colombia through to northern Paraguay (formerly northern Argentina)
  Blue-throated macaw
(Ara glaucogularis)
75–85 cm (30–34 in) long. Blue upperparts and mostly yellow lowerparts, blue throat. Areas of pale skin on the sides of the face are covered with lines of small dark-blue feathers, with pinkish bare skin at the base of the beak.[9]   North Bolivia
  Scarlet macaw
(Ara macao)
81–96 cm (32–36 in) long. Mostly bright red, with red, yellow and blue in the wings. There is bare white skin around the each eye extending to the bill.   Mexico to Colombia and the Amazon Basin.
  Military macaw
(Ara militaris)
70 cm (28 in) long. Mostly green, red forehead[10]   Discontinuous distribution in Mexico and along the Andes from Venezuela to north Argentina.
  Red-fronted macaw
(Ara rubrogenys)
55–60 cm (21.5–23.5 in) long. Mostly green. red forehead and red patch over the ears, pinkish skin on the face, red at bend of wings, blue primary wing feathers[11]   Central Bolivia
  Chestnut-fronted macaw
or severe macaw
(Ara severa)
46 cm (18 in) long. Mostly green, chestnut forehead, red at bend of wings   Panama and South America in the Chocó and Amazon Basin
  Cuban macaw
(Ara tricolor)
Extinct ca. 1885
50 cm (20 in) long. Red forehead fading to orange and then to yellow at the nape of the neck, dark brown bill paler at the tip; orange face, chin, chest, abdomen and thighs; upper back mainly brownish red, and the rump and lower back blue; brown, red and purplish-blue wing feathers; upper surface of the tail was dark red fading to blue at the tip, and brownish red underneath.[2]   Extinct - formerly endemic on Cuba and probably also on Isla de la Juventud (previously called the Isle of Pines).[2]
  Lesser Antillean macaw
or Guadeloupe macaw
(Ara guadeloupensis)
Extinct
Tail feathers 15–20 inches long. Similar colour as the scarlet macaw, but smaller with an entirely red tail. Known from descriptions and possibly paintings and subfossils.   Extinct - Guadeloupe
  St. Croix macaw
(Ara autocthones)
Extinct
Only known from sub-fossil bones found at two archeological sites.[12]   Extinct - Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands and central Puerto Rico
           

Orthopsittaca
  Orthopsittaca
  Common and binomial names Image Description Map Range
  Red-bellied macaw
(Orthopsittaca manilata)
Orthopsittaca manilata -Brazil-6.jpg 46 cm (18 in) long, mainly green, burgundy red patch on the belly, blue forehead and upper wings, and a grey tint to the breast. The underwings and undertail are dull yellow. Bare mustard yellow skin covers most of its face. South America

Primolius

 

Primolius

  Common and binomial names Image Description Map Range
  Blue-headed macaw
or Coulon's macaw
(Primolius couloni)
Blue-headed Macaw RWD2.jpg 41 cm (16 in) long, mostly green with head, flight feathers and primary coverts blue. The uppertail has a maroon base, a narrow green center and a blue tip. The undertail and underwing are greenish-yellow/ The bill is pale greyish-horn with a black base. Unlike most other macaws, the facial skin and lores are dark greyish.[13] South America  
  Blue-winged macaw
or Illiger's macaw
(Primolius maracana)
Primolius maracana -Palmitos Park -Gran Canaria-8a.jpg 40 cm (16 in) long, mostly green, the upperside of some of the wing feathers are blue, and the underside of the wings are yellowish, the tail-tip, crown and cheeks are bluish, and the tail-base and a belly-patch are red. The iris is amber. The bare facial-skin is yellowish, which may be white in captivity, the beak is all black[14] South America  
  Golden-collared macaw
or yellow-collared macaw
(Primolius auricollis)
Primolius auricollis -Panaewa Rainforest Zoo, Hawaii, USA -two-8b-2c.jpg 38 cm (15 in) long, mostly green, yellow band on the back of the neck, tail feathers have are red at the base fading to greens and blues, dark brown or black forehead, pink legs, the beak is dark grey with a paler grey tip South America

Diopsittaca
  Diopsittaca
  Common and binomial names Image Description Map Range
  Red-shouldered macaw
or Hahn's macaw
(Diopsittaca nobilis)
Diopsittaca nobilis -pet-2-4c.JPG 30 cm (12 in) long, mostly green, with dark or slate blue feathers on the forehead and crown. The wings and tail have feathers that are bright green above and olive-green below. The leading edges of the wings, especially on the underside, are red. The irises are orange, and the featherless skin on the face is white. There are three subspecies. South America